Chicago PD, episode thirteen

Voight walks up to the scene. The unit is talking about the victim. She’s 15 and a ward of the state. She ran away from Brady, the state funded home she was sent to, and they never reported her. Voight and Platt explain it to the commander. They used to get a lot of calls from Brady but suddenly, it dropped to nearly none. They didn’t clean up. They just stopped calling.

Halstead goes undercover at Brady to see what’s going on at the home. He gets the lay of the land from one of the other employees.

Olinsky and Burgess get the autopsy briefing. She got hit in the head and that’s what killed her. Going through her file, Erin finds that she was held at 21 last year and Platt signed the paperwork. Platt doesn’t remember her at all though.

Brady finally reports the girl missing and Erin and Atwater roll up to talk to the staff. Turns out she was checked in at 7 that morning, 24 hours after she died. There’s a fight in the cafeteria and the employee has to go help. Halstead is on hand too pulling girls apart.

He helps get a girl into isolation and calm her down. While they are alone she starts touching and trying to kiss him but he rejects her. She tells him that that’s how it works here. He reports back to the unit about it and they look into it.

Back at Brady, Halstead talks to the girl from the day before. He asks her how things work and she tells him she does what he wants for a train ticket out of Chicago. He tells her not yet and she tells him he’s a waste. In the hall afterward, another resident tells him to watch himself or people will talk.

Atwater and Burgess are on the street asking about their victim. They find out that she was a hooker turning tricks on a corner three times a week.

Halstead talks to Vince about the implication that the resident will rat on him. Vince tells him it’s still wrong and he needs to stop. At bed checks, the girl he was talking to suddenly looks like she’s been pushed around. She tells him she fell and won’t talk to him.

He goes back and talks to Voight and Olinsky about it. He’s convinced Vince is responsible for their victim but Voight thinks they need more. Halstead wants to pull the plug. Voight says it is Halstead’s call.

Platt talks to the victim’s social worker. None of her foster families will claim her.

Halstead gives the girl a train ticket in exchange for a talk. She wants to help but doesn’t think it’s safe. He tells her that he is a cop. She tells him about the secret hidden room at Brady that is full of hooker supplies and has an exit. Halstead finds blood on the floor and calls it in.

The unit moves in. They separate the staff from the residents and pull Halstead’s girl out. Voight talks to her. She describes the night of the murder to him and Halstead. She says that the murderer is the resident that threatened Halstead. They take her to interrogation and she says that it wasn’t her. It was Ellie, Halstead’s girl, and as it turns out, there is evidence to back that up.

Halstead talks to Ellie again. She sticks to her story. The unit has to figure out which girl is lying. Halstead remembers something. The other girl, Tonja, was snooping around an empty classroom an awful lot. He and Erin go to investigate it and find evidence. She’s done. Halstead busts Vince and Erin gets Ellie placed with a family.

Platt doesn’t track down a family so she carries out the victim’s last wishes herself. Voight goes with her.

I felt bad for Halstead in this episode. I get that it’s his job and he’s doing good but he was in a tough spot and Voight and Olinsky were just sort of blase about it. I’m glad he was the focus for once though. That hasn’t happened in a while.

Chicago PD is new Wednesdays at 10 p.m.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s